Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing


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If you believe family and friends can benefit from our forum, suggest they sign up on our website. Our new book is available from Amazon, Barnes and Noble , and other bookstores nationwide. Your email address will not be published. Receive news updates via email from this site. First Appointment with New Doctor Checklist List of questions, in order of importance, to ask your new doctor.

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New doctor has received all my medical records from former doctor s. Bring a detailed list of all current medications; over-the-counter meds; questions about meds. Or, bring the actual meds. Make sure your lawyer and all significant others have most update documents. Send or bring updated personal health records PHR. A lot of people get it, apparently. I was managing fine and it doesn't bother me, anyway. The UK doc told me the same thing, but also suggested I might have Meniere's Disease , and wanted to send me to a specialist to get it checked out.

Meniere's isn't really a disease, it's just a collection of symptoms: dizziness, hearing loss and a ringing in the ears. Again, there is no treatment.


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But it's rare. This freaked me out a little bit. I was used to the US system which is heavily "defensive. They also get paid more money for doing more work. Yet it was the NHS doctor that suggested extra treatment. Thomas' hospital in London, which I can see from my kitchen. Score one for America. In the UK, they said "we'll see you in January. This was a shock. I was going deaf now — not in six weeks!

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What the hell?! NHS waiting times are a real thing , it turns out. The NHS is great at primary or preventative care ie routine doctor appointments and emergency care. But it's pretty slow at non-emergency specialist care for chronic ailments. You typically wait 20 weeks to see a specialist, according to the NHS's own stats. I comforted myself with the assumption that the staff had made a decision that my condition was likely not life- or health-threatening, and had moved me to the back of the line.

It was frustrating. Ultimately, I also needed to change my appointment because I had to leave the country on business, and this was quite difficult to do. I had to call a few times, basically to catch the hospital booking staff at the right time of day, in order to do it. I wished Guy's and St. Thomas' had an online system for this, but they don't — just a bunch of people answering phones, most of whom don't have access to the right appointment schedule.

It was that appointment system again: You're booked in according to their priority, not yours. The big lesson with the NHS is, it's a lot easier to just show up when you're told. In the US, I expect to wait up to an hour in the specialist's waiting room on the day of my appointment.

Nothing ever happens promptly on the day in US healthcare, as far as I can tell.

In the NHS, again, I waited only a couple of minutes. Credit to the staff at St. Thomas, they are cranking through their patients.

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Again, the NHS care was great. I saw two different doctors within an hour, one for testing and one for diagnosing.


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  • A third admin staffer was coordinating the lists so there was no doctor downtime. It was like being in a highly efficient factory. It looked like hard work. I could tell that one of my doctors was not interested in chatting. She treated me, and wanted me out the door. There was a bunch of patients behind me, after all. In America, docs seem to be happy to chat as long as you want — and you can tell that extra couple of minutes with each patient creates long delays as the day wears on.

    The good news: I am not going deaf! I have great hearing, it turns out. They even showed me a chart of it. But the tinnitus — ringing in my ears that started years ago because I attended a lot of punk rock gigs in my youth — has gotten worse, making me feel more deaf.

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    This was reassuring. In no way was my treatment rationed or denied, the way Americans fear. It was just the same as in the US, with the same number of docs and the same level of high-tech equipment. But ER was the best of them. There have been a lot of great TV doctors, on ER and on lots of other shows.

    But the most radical thing about ER — the element of the show that no subsequent medical show has replicated or improved upon — is that it was always also a show about nurses. A character with the unlikely name Nurse Fryday shows up for three episodes to stop Dr. Murphy from ordering too many tests. Nurses on TV also tend to show up in ones or twos — Carla and Laverne are the only nurses to play a major role in Scrubs , and of them, only Carla is given her own stories.

    Taub has a love child with one of the nurses on House. Nurses are occasionally ball busters or rabble rousers. On New Amsterdam , the nurses staged a walkout but almost none of these nurse characters have names. Nurses are almost always secondary figures, in other words. They tend to be marginal, expendable, interchangeable, or primarily there to support the development of the doctors. This was not the case on ER , pretty much from the jump. The story that follows is mostly about Dr. Greene, but the woman who wakes him up is not anonymous — her name is Lydia Wright. There are signs and pieces of paper hung all over the walls.

    In one of my favorite shots from the pilot episode, Dr.

    Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing
    Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing
    Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing
    Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing
    Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing Just What the Doctor Ordered: An Insiders Guide to Medical Writing

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